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Common Sense says

Actions and touch relay more to their partner than any word. They are miserable when they are not together. They are as close to a perfect mate as is possible. Unfortunately, circumstances prohibit their expressions of love freely and they must hide their true feelings until they are alone. This alone time is often entirely too brief and often interfered with by outside forces such as weather or random events suddenly coming up. However once they are together the feelings are so intense that they feel they could never part again.

In another life those star-crossed lovers could be together, but for now they must keep it hidden. Two people who care immensely for each other but due to their circumstaces cannot be together. Eden and Elli are star-crossed lovers. To be doomed within a relationship, To be opposed by fate is to be a star crossed lover.

3LAU - Star Crossed (Official Video)

Even though the story focuses on the unlikely pairing of humans and aliens, its greater themes of prejudice and tolerance can be applied to more tangible racial and social relationships today. The characters' encounters explore different reactions to these issues, from violent protestation to peaceful assimilation, always with realistically mixed results.

Star-Crossed by Minnie Darke: | alymamrop.tk: Books

The show also compares how the generation gap affects people's feelings on the issue. Some confrontations get heated, and humans call Atrians "Tatties," which references the tattoos on their skin and is meant as a racial slur. A mixed bag. Some characters -- both Atrian and human -- are unyielding in their prejudice against the other side, and they take out their frustrations in destructive ways. Others, including Roman and Emery, try hard to bridge the gap between the two groups as they look for what makes them similar rather than different.

Because their relationship is the heart of the story, the overriding message is one of tolerance rather than bigotry. Confrontations between humans and Atrians often turn violent, whether it's a fistfight between teens or more serious exchanges with guns among adult aliens and human law enforcement. Some victims are shown dying or dead and are usually bloody. Parents need to know that Star-Crossed is a teen-geared story of forbidden love set against the backdrop of a tantalizing drama about aliens' rocky assimilation into a suburban community.

It's easy to cheer the teens' noble determination to forge a relationship despite pressure to keep them apart, but the show also does a great job of exploring the issue of prejudice from numerous angles that prompt viewers to take a fresh look at race relations in society today. Some confrontations between the two sides turn violent, so expect to see fistfights and the use of guns, which result in fatalities on both sides of the divide.

Teen romance yields longing glances and minimal physical contact such as handholding and brief kissing. Many humans call the aliens "Tatties," which is meant as a racial slur. Add your rating See all 4 parent reviews. Add your rating See all 8 kid reviews. Ten years ago, an alien aircraft crashed into a suburban town, sparking a violent battle between humans and the newcomers who were fleeing their dying planet of Atria and for refuge on Earth.

In the midst of the conflict, a young Atrian boy fled the violence and briefly befriended a compassionate young human girl, who was devastated when police shot him as he tried to protect her. The government rounded up the surviving Atrians and quarantined them in a camp called the Sector, cutting them off from contact with humans.

Now a decade later, seven Atrian teens are enrolled in a public high school to test the waters of assimilation, and their arrival sets off a new round of confrontations between the two sides. Meanwhile, now-grown Emery Aimee Teegarden is surprised to discover that one of the Atrians is Roman Matt Lanter , who miraculously didn't die as she had assumed all those years ago. As their bond deepens, they feel pulled apart by the strain between their people that threatens to sever any progress toward understanding the two sides have made.

Parents say

There's no way to avoid getting caught up in Emery and Roman's melodramatic tug-of-war between their feelings for each other and society's pressure to keep them apart, and it is fun to celebrate the small victories of true love along the way. But the show pays just as much attention to exploring the issues of prejudice and tolerance from multiple angles as it does to the lovey-dovey stuff.

What does this mean for your teens? Star-Crossed 's content is fairly tame for this age group, save for the violent exchanges that erupt between the two groups of characters. But even that serves a purpose, illustrating how a confrontation can escalate when people take different stances on an issue. This show doesn't set out to be preachy or solve the matter itself, but it does encourage viewers to take a fresh look at the longstanding issue of prejudice, and it will prompt some worthwhile discussions with your teens about where society stands today.

Families can talk about the degree to which this story reflects true events in human history. Where do you see similarities between racial relations through the years and the points the show makes? How much progress have we made toward true tolerance? Do you think that's an attainable goal?

Does this series set out to influence viewers' feelings on the subject of prejudice? Why do you think the Atrian characters were cast to look more human than alien? The show also compares how the generation gap affects people's feelings on the issue. Some confrontations get heated, and humans call Atrians "Tatties," which references the tattoos on their skin and is meant as a racial slur. A mixed bag. Some characters -- both Atrian and human -- are unyielding in their prejudice against the other side, and they take out their frustrations in destructive ways.

Others, including Roman and Emery, try hard to bridge the gap between the two groups as they look for what makes them similar rather than different.

Star-crossed

Because their relationship is the heart of the story, the overriding message is one of tolerance rather than bigotry. Confrontations between humans and Atrians often turn violent, whether it's a fistfight between teens or more serious exchanges with guns among adult aliens and human law enforcement. Some victims are shown dying or dead and are usually bloody.

Parents need to know that Star-Crossed is a teen-geared story of forbidden love set against the backdrop of a tantalizing drama about aliens' rocky assimilation into a suburban community. It's easy to cheer the teens' noble determination to forge a relationship despite pressure to keep them apart, but the show also does a great job of exploring the issue of prejudice from numerous angles that prompt viewers to take a fresh look at race relations in society today.

Some confrontations between the two sides turn violent, so expect to see fistfights and the use of guns, which result in fatalities on both sides of the divide. Teen romance yields longing glances and minimal physical contact such as handholding and brief kissing. Many humans call the aliens "Tatties," which is meant as a racial slur. Add your rating See all 4 parent reviews.

Common Sense says

Add your rating See all 8 kid reviews. Ten years ago, an alien aircraft crashed into a suburban town, sparking a violent battle between humans and the newcomers who were fleeing their dying planet of Atria and for refuge on Earth. In the midst of the conflict, a young Atrian boy fled the violence and briefly befriended a compassionate young human girl, who was devastated when police shot him as he tried to protect her. The government rounded up the surviving Atrians and quarantined them in a camp called the Sector, cutting them off from contact with humans.

Now a decade later, seven Atrian teens are enrolled in a public high school to test the waters of assimilation, and their arrival sets off a new round of confrontations between the two sides. Meanwhile, now-grown Emery Aimee Teegarden is surprised to discover that one of the Atrians is Roman Matt Lanter , who miraculously didn't die as she had assumed all those years ago.


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As their bond deepens, they feel pulled apart by the strain between their people that threatens to sever any progress toward understanding the two sides have made. There's no way to avoid getting caught up in Emery and Roman's melodramatic tug-of-war between their feelings for each other and society's pressure to keep them apart, and it is fun to celebrate the small victories of true love along the way.

But the show pays just as much attention to exploring the issues of prejudice and tolerance from multiple angles as it does to the lovey-dovey stuff. What does this mean for your teens?

Star Crossed

Star-Crossed 's content is fairly tame for this age group, save for the violent exchanges that erupt between the two groups of characters. But even that serves a purpose, illustrating how a confrontation can escalate when people take different stances on an issue. This show doesn't set out to be preachy or solve the matter itself, but it does encourage viewers to take a fresh look at the longstanding issue of prejudice, and it will prompt some worthwhile discussions with your teens about where society stands today.

Families can talk about the degree to which this story reflects true events in human history. Where do you see similarities between racial relations through the years and the points the show makes? How much progress have we made toward true tolerance? Do you think that's an attainable goal? Does this series set out to influence viewers' feelings on the subject of prejudice?